Meeting Date Change- December Coalition Meeting Being Held Friday, 12/9

JPACC's December Coalition Meeting will be held on Friday, December 9th, 9-10 am in the Media Room of the District  Attorney's Office.

Following the coalition meeting, from 10:30am - 4:30pm, we will be hosting a meeting with other coalitions from around the state of Louisiana to discuss statewide initiatives, advocacy, and collaboration efforts. All of our coalition members are welcome to attend and participate in the meeting. If you plan on attending, please RSVP here to ensure we have an accurate count for lunch. 

Of Eden: A Visual Dialogue of War Art Exhibition

Check out the exhibition catalogue here....

When & Where:

International House Hotel
221 Camp Street, New Orleans, LA 70130
Exhibition runs September 15 - October 18

About the Exhibition:

Of Eden seeks to create space and opportunity for a visual dialogue, tackling one of the most significant aspects of human behavior – conflict and organized aggression, in the context of the “War on Terror”. The very nature of war is traumatic and the premise of this exhibition is that “in war, there are no unwounded soldiers”. 

We believe in the power of art, literature and culture to tell the stories of war and to heal the wounds that often go unseen. Of Eden includes the work of veteran, service member and civilian artists that utilize drawing, painting, print work, installation and the written word to share their unique, controversial and often less heard perspectives on military service and war.  

All artworks is available for purchase, unless otherwise stated, with proceeds benefiting JPACC Foundation’s Dialogues on the Experience of War Project and the Of Eden Documentary Film Project.

Surgeon General's Turn the Tide Initiative to Address the Opioid Epidemic

UNITED STATES SURGEON GENERAL

Vivek H. Murthy, M.D., M.B.A. 

August 2016

Dear Colleague,

I am asking for your help to solve an urgent health crisis facing America: the opioid epidemic. Everywhere I travel, I see communities devastated by opioid overdoses. I meet families too ashamed to seek treatment for addiction. And I will never forget my own patient whose opioid use disorder began with a course of morphine after a routine procedure.

It is important to recognize that we arrived at this place on a path paved with good intentions. Nearly two decades ago, we were encouraged to be more aggressive about treating pain, often without enough training and support to do so safely. This coincided with heavy marketing of opioids to doctors. Many of us were even taught – incorrectly – that opioids are not addictive when prescribed for legitimate pain.

The results have been devastating. Since 1999, opioid overdose deaths have quadrupled and opioid prescriptions have increased markedly – almost enough for every adult in America to have a bottle of pills. Yet the amount of pain reported by Americans has not changed. Now, nearly 2 million people in America have a prescription opioid use disorder, contributing to increased heroin use and the spread of HIV and hepatitis C.

I know solving this problem will not be easy. We often struggle to balance reducing our patients’ pain with increasing their risk of opioid addiction. But, as clinicians, we have the unique power to help end this epidemic. As cynical as times may seem, the public still looks to our profession for hope during difficult moments. This is one of those times.

That is why I am asking you to pledge your commitment to turn the tide on the opioid crisis. Please take the pledge. Together, we will build a national movement of clinicians to do three things:

First, we will educate ourselves to treat pain safely and effectively. A good place to start is this pocket guide with the CDC Opioid Prescribing Guideline. Second, we will screen our patients for opioid use disorder and provide or connect them with evidence-based treatment. Third, we can shape how the rest of the country sees addiction by talking about and treating it as a chronic illness, not a moral failing.

Years from now, I want us to look back and know that, in the face of a crisis that threatened our nation, it was our profession that stepped up and led the way. I know we can succeed because health care is more than an occupation to us. It is a calling rooted in empathy, science, and service to humanity. These values unite us. They remain our greatest strength. 

Thank you for your leadership.

Out of Darkness Walk- September 10, 2016, Audubon Park

 

We are joining the community of nearly 250k people walking in hundreds of cities across the country in support of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention's mission to save lives and bring hope to those affected by suicide.

Please help us reach our fundraising goal by donating to a team member. To donate online, please select "Roster" and then choose one of the team members listed. Once you're on their page, click "Donate Now." Donations can only be made to individuals, but the total each participant raises goes toward our team goal.

All donations are 100% tax deductible and will help bring AFSP one step closer to achieving their bold goal to reduce the suicide rate 20% by 2025.

You can also support us by registering to walk with our team - just click the link below. 

Thank you!

June Suicide Prevention Meeting

Good Morning Everyone,

Want to announce our next Youth Suicide Prevention meeting will be on Thursday, June 23rd at the DA' s office. From 10-12. Park in the courthouse parking garage and bring your ticket for validation. Notes from the last months meeting will be sent out by Chantrell Hunt by next week. So put it on your calendar and come join us. 

Hope you all are having a great start to your month, besides its SUMMER time! Time for backyard BBQ's, swim parties, vacations, suntans, sunsets and long evening walks. It's a great time to be alive and savor every moment with family and friends. With this in mind, it also helps us embrace why we do what we do in prevention. You guys are all AMAZING, and I'm so thankful I get to serve with the most active Suicide Prevention Team on the planet!! 

Sincerely, 

MAJ (Ret) Frances A. Roberts, JPACC Volunteer froberts@jpacc.net

 

Mental Health Resources for College Students

The National Alliance on Mental Illness reported the following about college students:

  • 30% struggle with school work due to mental illness
  • 25% experience suicidal thoughts
  • 14% engage in reckless behavior

These shocking numbers moved the team at BestColleges.com to do more research about mental illness among students. We realized those struggling with mental illness contend with a true disability that requires the full support of their learning community. We published our College Guide for Students with Psychiatric Disabilities as a way to start a conversation about this issue. Our goal is to share this with as many students, families, and educators as possible.
 

For more information or questions, please contact:

Heather Landry | heather@bestcolleges.com
Community Outreach Coordinator | BestColleges.com
P.O. Box 52755 | Houston, TX 77052 | Facebook | Twitter

SB271 Update

Below is an update we received regarding SB 271. It is a bill which changes current medical marijuana law from prescription to recommend and is opposed by Sheriff Normand and others.

Attached here you will find a copy of the vote.

Please let your Senators know your opinion about the bill.

 

From: "Dino Paternostro"
Date: Apr 19, 2016 3:58 PM
Subject: RE: Capitol Action TODAY in Senate - SB271 status
To: "Dino Paternostro"
Cc: 
Medical Marijuana Watchdog Coalition,
Late today SB271 by Mills was debated at length on the Senate Floor!  The spirited debate was led by Senator Mills for the proponents and Senator Martiny for the opponents (our guy), with several Senators speaking out on the bill from both sides (Long, Walsworth, Thompson tried to help) . Mid-way through Senator Claitor of Baton Rouge offered a good amendment to change the bill back to requiring a prescription.  Of course Mills objected, with the amendment failing 20-15.  At the close of the debate, the final vote was 19-16 in favor of the bill, but one vote short of the 20 votes required to pass a bill in the Senate. This is real progress in slowing down the bill, interjecting thoughtful policy concerns, and tightening the from last year when the Mills bill passed 22-13 in the Senate. Kudos to the team for a small and symbolic victory!
Next step, SB271 will be brought back for another vote, likely tomorrow afternoon.  We will thank the 16 Senators who voted against the bill today and empower them to stay strong tomorrow.   Also, we need to carefully review the 19 supporting votes to see if anyone can be turned, which is usually difficult to do.  If we can round up any other organized groups to join in the fight, it would help our numbers.  Assuming the bill eventually makes it out of the Senate, we will be in better shape for House action.
We may be the underdogs, but let’s keep up the pressure!  Dino
Dino Paternostro, MPH, CEcD
LegisLink, LLC
504-756-7904

How Do You Talk to Kids About Suicide? From the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

We are pleased to debut a series of 12 short, informative videos on suicide prevention, which feature AFSP-funded researchers who participated in the prestigious International Summit on Suicide Research held in New York this past October. Co-sponsored by AFSP and the International Academy of Suicide Research, this biennial conference is attended by suicide researchers from around the world.

The videos highlight topics including: Asking about Suicide; Safety Planning; Suicide in Older Adults; Suicide: From Research to Treatment; Teens, Drinking & Suicide - What Every Parent Should Know; Using Technology to Fight Suicide; Why We Need to Fund Suicide Prevention Research; and more, will be rolling out three per week for the next month, starting today. You can click right here to watch the first, which takes a look at how to talk to a child when you see warning signs for suicide.

Please look out for the rest of the videos throughout the month of April on AFSP.org, and AFSP Facebook and Twitter accounts!

Christine Moutier, M.D.
Chief Medical Officer
AFSP

Mobile Resources To Support Behavioral Health

Download Free Apps From SAMHSA

 

This New Year, resolve to promote positive behavioral health in your community. SAMHSA has resources that can help address some of the toughest mental health and substance use challenges, including suicide prevention, bullying prevention, behavioral health following a disaster, and underage drinking prevention.

  • Suicide Safe helps health care providers integrate suicide prevention strategies into their practice and address suicide risk among their patients.
  • KnowBullying provides information and guidance on ways to prevent bullying and build resilience in children. A great tool for parents and educators, KnowBullying is meant for kids ages 3 to 18.
  • SAMHSA Disaster App provides responders with access to critical resources—like Psychological First Aid and Responder Self-Care—and SAMHSA's Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator to help responders provide support to survivors after a disaster.
  • Talk. They Hear You is an interactive game that can help parents and caregivers prepare for one of the more important conversations they may ever have with children—underage drinking.

Learn More and Download SAMHSA's Free Mobile Apps